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Kids share – my daily journey to get to school

World Vision
8 September 2015 by Laura Tay
Kids share – my daily journey to get to school

Photo by Khaing Min Htoo, World Vision.

My mum drove me to school pretty much every day until I started year 9 or 10. Then I decided it would be more fun to walk with my friends – and it was just a 15 – 20 minute trip through leafy suburban streets.
Around the world, lots of kids don’t have it that easy . Whether it is extreme weather, a dangerous environment or just a very long distance, many children find it much more challenging just to get to school each day. Despite the difficulty, these kids are dedicated to getting the best education they can!
We asked a few children from communities where we work across Asia to share their daily journey to school – take a look below!

Photo by Rena Tanjun, World Vision

Photo by Rena Tanjun, World Vision

Henokh from Indonesia and his friends ride their horses to school each day – it is the only form of transportation available in their village! It takes them over an hour to get to school, and in the rainy season streams like this one be difficult to get across. Henokh dreams of being a soccer player, and his brother Arnolance wants to be a policeman!

Photo by Ammala Thomisith, World Vision

Photo by Ammala Thomisith, World Vision

“I bike together with my friends to school,” says Tay from Laos. When World Vision first started working in her community, there was no road linking her village with the school. Children had to walk through fields and water, and couldn’t make it to school if the river was too high. World Vision helped to build a new road, so Tay and her friends can get to school easily!

Photo by Daniel Mung, World Vision

Photo by Daniel Mung, World Vision

Sarvan is from India, and his journey to school takes one and a half hours of walking through the desert. He and his friends stop to drink water and sit in the shade along the way, because the heat can reach over 50 degrees. Sarvan wants to become a doctor to help the sick and the poor in his community, so he usually stays back at school for one or two hours each day to study.

Photo by Khaing Min Htoo, World Vision

Photo by Khaing Min Htoo, World Vision

“I love going to school walking together with my friends every day. It is fun. I love riding the boat as well as riding the small truck,” said Aye Aye from Myanmar. When the roads are dry, she and her friends ride on the back of a truck for the 45-minute trip to school. When it is rainy, they walk for half an hour and then make the rest of the trip by boat – which takes another hour. They always need to wash their muddy feet before they go in the boat!

Photo by Rena Tanjung, World Vision, World Vision

Photo by Rena Tanjung, World Vision, World Vision

Though there is a school building in Melvi’s village in Indonesia, there are no teachers there. Each day he and his friends cross multiple rivers and walk up a steep cliff to get to the next closest school – a dangerous journey, where children have been injured before. Despite the challenges, Melvi and the other children love going to school and learning to read and write.
World Vision works to ensure that all children can go to school, and get a good quality education while they are there. See how your donation could help kids get the education they deserve.

Laura Tay Laura Tay

Laura is a Writer for World Vision Australia.

 

2 Responses

  • Vigelance Ndou says:

    real nice shoots, good photographing skills, especially Rena. Indeed World Vision is doing a great job in trying to alleviate poverty which some of us face each and every day. We really appreciate.

    • TimJ, World Vision team says:

      Hi Vigelance Ndou, thank you for your kind words for our work, for Rena and our photographers. Great to receive your feedback and how our work helps those who just need a hand up in life! All the best. -TimJ, World Vision Australia Team.

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