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Nepal Earthquake: “I want to go back to my home but it will not be the same as before”

World Vision
30 April 2015 by Sunjuli Singh
Nepal Earthquake: “I want to go back to my home but it will not be the same as before”

Sandhya is afraid to go home, after she witnessed the devastating impact of the Nepal Earthquake in her city. Photo by Sunjuli Singh, World Vision

“I want to go back to my home but it will not be the same as before, which frightens me. That is why I have not even gone to see the condition of my house,” says 13-year-old Sandhya, from Lalitpur.

Sandhya was singing and playing with her friends when the Nepal Earthquake struck on Saturday. Her family had gone to the farm while she was at home, staying with her visually impaired uncle.

She was just outside her home when the ground started shaking and she saw dust rising over her city. Within seconds she started seeing houses toppling down.

As soon as the earth stopped shaking Sandhya went inside her house to find her uncle and take him outside.

Sandhya was worried about her family but thankfully her grandfather came rushing home and most of their family found somewhere safe to stay.

However her brother, Sayan, was missing.

Sandhya and her family in the crowded tent shelter they are staying in. Photo by Sunjuli Singh, World Vision

Sandhya and her family in the crowded tent shelter they are staying in. Photo by Sunjuli Singh, World Vision

Nine-year-old Sayan had been playing with his friends in a nearby field when the earthquake struck. Afterwards he was very scared and went to search for his parents. He could not find them and was unable to go anywhere because of the dust and the shock that he was feeling.

Sabi, their mother, worried she would never see her son again but refused to give up hope and started searching. After three hours she found him alive. He was in tears and covered in sweat.

“I am afraid to go and see our house as well as to go back to school because the earthquake may come again. I miss TV, food and my own room to rest,” says Sandhya.

Meanwhile Sayan misses his football and playing hide and seek with his friends.

Both of their eyes still show fear and uncertainty.

“We just need something good for our shelter now because I know we will not be able to stay in our house and the constant rain has made it difficult for us to stay in the cold. I don’t have the confidence to even go and see my house, imagining the destruction I have seen in front of my eyes. But there is so much disturbance here in the tent with too many people inside it that I have not been able to sleep well,” says Sandhya, solemnly.

There are almost 200 people staying in the same place as Sandhya and Sayan – around 40 of them are children.

Parents are worried about shelter for themselves and their children as the large number of people in one place makes it difficult to sleep or rest. The constant rain dampens the mud floor and water drips through the holes in the tents.

“I am worried about my children as my house is damaged very badly inside and they are in so much shock that I don’t know what to do. I am myself so much in shock thinking of whatever I experienced so it’s very natural for them to feel like that. I don’t know how long we will stay here but once people start moving back to their homes or other places I will also have to move but how, I don’t know,” exclaims Sabi.

World Vision is already providing essential relief supplies to survivors of the Nepal Earthquake.

World Vision is already providing essential relief supplies to survivors of the Nepal Earthquake.

Shelter is one of the most needed items for the earthquake survivors as their houses have collapsed and the ongoing tremors have made them afraid to go back to their homes. You can help World Vision provide essential emergency relief supplies by supporting our Nepal Earthquake Appeal.

Sunjuli Singh Sunjuli Singh

Sunjuli is a communications specialist for World Vision Nepal.

 

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